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Welcome to the 1% Sales Tax Forum Page

Brought to you by Union Park District Council and the League of Women Voters of Saint Paul

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What did you think?
Your feedback helps shape the work that we do. Please consider taking a minute and let us know what you thought and how we can address  topics that matter to you in the coming year: leah@unionparkdc.org

Would you like to contact a panelist? Here's how:
Mayor Melvin Carter, Mayor of the City of Saint Paul 
Sean Kershaw, Director of Public Works, City of Saint Paul
Andy Rodriguez, Director of Parks and Recreation, City of Saint Paul

Amanda Duerr, Vice President of Government Affairs, Saint Paul Area Chamber
Bill Lindeke, Lecturer in Urban Studies at the Department of Geography, Environment and Society, University of Minnesota

Martha Njolomole, Economist, Center of the American Experiment

Learn More and Get Involved: Resources from the Panel  

From the Mayor's Office: stpaul.gov/salestax
Learn more about the proposed sales tax on the city's sales tax page. This page includes an overview of the street improvements and the parks and facilities improvements at the center of this proposal. Further informational sessions offered by the City of Saint Paul are also listed. Feedback is received throughout this site as well. You will also find several commonly asked questions and the city's responses. Learn why the Mayor's office proposes this as the best path forward above other options like property tax. 

 

From Amanda Duerr: https://www.stpaulchamber.com/sales-tax-opposition.html
Learn why the Saint Paul Area Chamber objects to the sales tax proposal on their Sales Tax Opposition page. Access the chamber's objection, testimony before the Senate tax committee, letters submitted to multiple tax committees, and public comments on this page.
 

From Bill Lindeke Ph.D.: https://itep.org/whopays/ and https://www.revenue.state.mn.us/tax-incidence-studies

First, see the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy to access a state-by-state report showing the cumulative regressivity of each state's tax policy. You can see that today, MN ranks as one of the best. Next, visit the Minnesota Department of Revenue Tax Incidence Study and see that sales taxes are among the worst for working-class people.

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